Day 1,009: Lesser (Magellanic) Horned Owl. Torres del Paine National Park.

Laetitia led a tour that began with several days in Torres del Paine National Park in Chile. Her daily limericks featured the wildlife and geology of the park. The local Horned Owl is a close relative of the more familiar one in the northern hemisphere.

Up north, the Horned Owl is called “Great”
But “Lesser” in the Austral state,
Patagonian Chile,
Which is kind of silly
For I think that they both are first rate.

Day 1,008: Puma. Torres del Paine National Park.

Laetitia led a tour that began with several days in Torres del Paine National Park in Chile. Her daily limericks featured the wildlife and geology of the park. The park is a living laboratory for studying predator-prey relationships with the guanaco and puma as study subjects.

Patagonian guanaco’s bane,
The elusive big cat of the plain,
Is the Chilean puma,
The carnivore “summa,”
At the top of the local food chain.

Day 1,007: Guanaco. Torres del Paine National Park.

Laetitia led a tour that began with several days in Torres del Paine National Park in Chile. Her daily limericks featured the wildlife and geology of the park. One of the most commonly observed mammals in the park is the guanaco, a wild relative of the domesticated llama.

It’s long-necked and cinnamon furred
This elegant beast of the herd,
A polygynous mammal
That’s kin to the camel
And tends to be seen more than heard.

Day 1,006: Darwin’s Rhea. Torres del Paine National Park.

Laetitia led a tour that began with several days in Torres del Paine National Park in Chile. Her daily limericks featured the wildlife and geology of the park. Rheas are large running ground birds similar to ostriches. Darwin described the Patagonian rhea when he was here on HMS Beagle in 1833.

On the Torres del Paine grassland
Rheas often are seen in a band
Moving swiftly around.
Though they don’t leave the ground
They give tourists a view that is grand.